Web Design

5 Skills Every Successful Web Designer Needs—And How to Learn Them

Web designer. Is it just us, or does that have a nice ring to it? And it’s not just a catchy title—learning web design can lead to an exciting and fascinating career, especially for a creative problem-solver like you.

But just the idea of getting started in web design can be overwhelming. Maybe you’re secretly thinking: what do web designers do? Or maybe even: what is web design?

How to Learn Web Design: Tech Skills

First, let’s go over the technical side of becoming a web designer. All those strange acronyms and terms can seem intimidating, but they’re actually pretty easy (and super fun!) once you get to know them.

1. Visual Design

It might seems obvious that you need design knowledge to be a web designer, but visual design focuses on digital products, so it might be different than what you expect. In this case, design principles are what determine the look and feel of a site. They can range from proportions to typography, to grid systems, to color theory. In other words: visual design is your chance to dig into creating mood boards and type hierarchy and experimenting with web fonts and color palettes.

2. UX

Here come those funny abbreviations! UX stands for user experience, or how people feel (calm, frustrated, etc.) when they use a website. Above all else, UX is about approaching your designs from a user-first perspective—how can you design a website that helps them get exactly what they need?

To do that, you’ll research your users and create “personas” (profiles of imaginary ideal users). You’ll lay out the pages and content with a site map. You’ll figure out the path users take on your site in user flows. (For example, do they always click straight through to social media? Or are they just looking for contact information?) And you’ll build wireframes to sketch out the key parts of each webpage. All of these components are essential to practicing user experience design.

Pro tip: Still confused about the difference between all these types of design skills, and which one you should learn first? We recently broke down the difference between visual design and web or website design, as well as UX design and graphic design if you want more clarity!

3. Design Software

Like any craftsperson, to do your work you need the right tools. Knowing your way around the industry standards will be helpful in every case and critical in many. While designing a website can be done right in a web browser, tools like Adobe Photoshop, Illustrator, and Sketch are ones that almost all designers use for important parts of their job like creating mockups, designing assets (think logos and images), and of course modifying and enhancing photos. You should learn how to use them (although, if you’re just getting started, consider trying out a few free photoshop alternatives instead)

4. HTML

You might not have imagined that a web designer would need to know how to code. But nowadays it’s an expected skill for most design jobs. HTML stands for HyperText Markup Language, which is the coding language used to put content on a web page and give it structure. That means it’s how you turn a bunch of words into headlines, paragraphs, and footers. And it’s also how you get the “cool” content like photos, videos, and graphics on a website.

5. CSS

And then there’s HTML’s partner, CSS or Cascading Style Sheets. CSS is the code that tells browsers how to format and style HTML for a web page. In other words, it’s what makes all the text and other content look good. With CSS, you can adjust the colors, change the fonts, or add a stunning background—and so much more! This is where your eye for design really shines and how you can put your creative stamp on every site you create.